Licensing Agreement


DEFINITION of 'Licensing Agreement'

This term refers to a written agreement entered into by the contractual owner of a property or activity giving permission to another to use that property or engage in an activity in relation to that property. The property involved in a licensing agreement can be real, personal or intellectual. Almost always, there will be some consideration exchanged between the licensor and the licensee.

BREAKING DOWN 'Licensing Agreement'

Licensing agreements can be an intangible but valuable asset in industries such as technology, biotechnology and publishing. These agreements are a large part of intellectual property law, particularly in terms of enforcement of copyrights, trademarks and patents.

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