Lien Sale

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Lien Sale'

The sale of the claim or "hold" placed on an asset to satisfy an unpaid debt. Typically, lien sales are conducted as public auctions and the lien is on real estate, automobiles and other personal property. Depending on a particular state's laws, contractors, subcontractors and suppliers may put a lien on a piece of property they have worked on pending payment for services rendered.

BREAKING DOWN 'Lien Sale'

Buying delinquent tax-liens at a sale is becoming an increasingly popular form of investing, and is similar to purchasing a long-term Certificate of Deposit (CD). However unlike a CD, tax-liens cannot be sold back to the taxing authority and must be held until they are repaid. Redemption of the purchased lien is typically at a given rate of return within a specified time frame.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Floating Lien

    A legal claim placed on a set of assets rather than on a single ...
  2. Property Lien

    A property lien is a legal claim on a tract of real estate granting ...
  3. Mechanic's Lien

    A guarantee of payment to builders, contracters and construction ...
  4. Lien

    The legal right of a creditor to sell the collateral property ...
  5. Tax Lien

    A legal claim by a government entity against a noncompliant taxpayer's ...
  6. Judgment Lien

    A court ruling that gives a creditor the right to take possession ...
Related Articles
  1. Retirement

    Holding Titles On Real Property

    Find out how best to claim and convey ownership on your assets.
  2. Home & Auto

    Attention Home Buyers! Why You Need A Lawyer

    Property transactions are complex and subject to specific state/local rules. A professional can simplify the process.
  3. Active Trading Fundamentals

    Matching Investing Risk Tolerance To Personality

    Understanding risk tolerance is crucial to the advisor/client relationship and any good investment policy statement.
  4. Term

    What are Mutually Exclusive Events?

    In statistics, mutually exclusive situations involve the occurrence of one event that does not influence or cause another event.
  5. Credit & Loans

    Refinance Vs. Debt Restructuring: What's Best For Your Credit Score?

    Discover key differences between refinancing and restructuring debt in regard to terms, the negotiation process and effect on credit scores.
  6. Professionals

    How to Avoid the Inheritance Nobody Wants: Debt

    With the biggest transfer of wealth underway, advisors need to ensure that clients don't also inherit debt.
  7. Credit & Loans

    Avoiding Red Flags with Online Mortgage Lenders

    Using an online mortgage lender can be convenient, but how do you know you can trust one? Follow these tips to make sure the lender is legit.
  8. Credit & Loans

    5 Ways to Up Your Chance of Getting a Mortgage

    Tips and ways to improve your chances of getting a mortgage.
  9. Investing Basics

    The 5 Reasons Why RadioShack Went Out of Business

    Learn five reasons why RadioShack went bankrupt: store concentration, online competition, product concentration, management issues and financial missteps.
  10. Retirement

    3 Reasons Your 401(k) Is Not Enough for Retirement

    Learn the basic structure of a 401(k), and a number of reasons why it may not be substantial enough to secure an individual's living upon retirement.
RELATED FAQS
  1. When do I need a letter of credit?

    A letter of credit, sometimes referred to as a documentary credit, acts as a promissory note from a financial institution, ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Can I take my 401(k) to buy a house?

    Once you reach 59.5, you can use the funds in your 401(k) retirement savings account to buy a house or any other expense ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Can I use my 401(k) as a collateral for a loan?

    Although federal Internal Revenue Service, or IRS, regulations prohibit using a 401(k) account as collateral for a loan, ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Why do commercial banks borrow from the Federal Reserve?

    Commercial banks borrow from the Federal Reserve primarily to meet reserve requirements when their cash on hand is low before ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How does a bank determine what my discretionary income is when making a loan decision?

    Discretionary income is the money left over from your gross income each month after taking out taxes and paying for necessities. ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What are the typical repayment terms for a syndicated loan?

    The typical repayment terms for a syndicated loan are periods of three to six years for short-term loans or seven to 10 years ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Recession

    A significant decline in activity across the economy, lasting longer than a few months. It is visible in industrial production, ...
  2. Bubble Theory

    A school of thought that believes that the prices of assets can temporarily rise far above their true values and that these ...
  3. Stock Market Crash

    A rapid and often unanticipated drop in stock prices. A stock market crash can be the result of major catastrophic events, ...
  4. Financial Crisis

    A situation in which the value of financial institutions or assets drops rapidly. A financial crisis is often associated ...
  5. Election Period

    The period of time during which an investor who owns an extendable or retractable bond must indicate to the issuer whether ...
  6. Shanghai Stock Exchange

    The largest stock exchange in mainland China, the Shanghai Stock Exchange is a nonprofit organization run by the China Securities ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!