Life Estate


DEFINITION of 'Life Estate'

A type of estate that only lasts for the lifetime of the beneficiary. A life estate is a very restrictive type of estate that prevents the beneficiary from selling the property that produces the income before the beneficiary's death. But the estate cannot continue beyond the life of the beneficiary.


Life estates are often created by donors who feel that their beneficiary will benefit more from the income from the estate than a lump-sum inheritance. Therefore these estates are invested in various income-producing instruments, such as bonds, CDs, oil and gas leases, REITs and other similar investments.

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