Life Settlement

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Life Settlement'

The selling of one's life insurance policy to a third party for a one time cash payment. The purchaser then becomes the beneficiary of the policy and begins paying the premiums. Typically the purchaser is an experienced institutional investor, and policies will have face amounts in excess of $250,000.

A life settlement is similar to a "viatical settlement".

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Life Settlement'

Life settlements are usually only done when the insured person doesn't have a known life-threatening illness. They are often done with "key individual" insurance policies held by companies on executives who no longer work there; the company has a chance to cash out on a policy that was previously illiquid.

Sometimes people outgrow their need for a specific life insurance policy, and a life settlement may offer the chance to gain more than the policy's cash surrender value.

RELATED TERMS
  1. European Life Settlement Association ...

    An organization created to promote fair standards for the life ...
  2. Estate Planning

    The collection of preparation tasks that serve to manage an individual's ...
  3. Universal Life Insurance

    A type of flexible permanent life insurance offering the low-cost ...
  4. Institutional Investor

    A non-bank person or organization that trades securities in large ...
  5. Trustee

    A person or firm that holds or administers property or assets ...
  6. Beneficiary

    Anybody who gains an advantage and/or profits from something. ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What are the restrictions for naming a given individual as my contingent beneficiary?

    Life insurance is an important part of estate planning. It allows you to ensure that you can financially take care of the ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What debt/equity ratio is typical for companies in the insurance sector?

    The debt-to-equity ratio is calculated by dividing total liabilities by total equity, and it is used to measure leverage. ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How does the risk of investing in the insurance sector compare to the broader market?

    Due to economic, demographic and interest rate trends, there is less risk when investing in the insurance sector compared ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is the main business model for insurance companies?

    Insurance companies base their business models around assuming and diversifying risk. The essential insurance model involves ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What economic indicators are important to monitor when investing in the insurance ...

    Inflation and interest rates are the best economic indicators to monitor when investing in the insurance sector. Unlike with ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Which insurance companies pay the highest dividends?

    For income investors, finding companies that pay above-average dividends consistently is key to creating and sustaining a ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Options & Futures

    Cashing In Your Life Insurance Policy

    Tough times call for desperate measures, but is raiding your life insurance policy even worth considering?
  2. Options & Futures

    Getting Started On Your Estate Plan

    With some preparation, you can save your heirs from paying a hefty estate tax. Here are some tips.
  3. Home & Auto

    Life Insurance Clauses Determine Your Coverage

    Understanding these key parts of your policy will help you to ensure that your family will be covered.
  4. Options & Futures

    Your Will: Why You Need A Power Of Attorney And Beneficiaries

    What would happen if you were suddenly unable to manage your financial affairs? Preparation is the best protection.
  5. Professionals

    Indexed Universal Life Policies: Watch These Risks

    By properly vetting indexed universal life policies, advisors and savers can avoid contracts that could prove overly costly over the long run.
  6. Professionals

    An Advisor's Guide to Prof. Liability Insurance

    A guide to what financial advisors need to know about professional liability insurance.
  7. Insurance

    India's Two-Child Policy

    As of 2014, 11 Indian states have passed laws to restrict Indian citizens from having no more than two children.
  8. Economics

    What Does Asymmetric Information Mean?

    Asymmetric information describes a situation where one party in a transaction knows more than the other.
  9. Fundamental Analysis

    How to Calculate a Combined Ratio

    Combined ratio is a formula used in the insurance industry to measure the performance of an insurance company.
  10. Professionals

    Tips for Helping Clients with Life Insurance Needs

    Life insurance needs will likely change over the client’s lifetime and again financial advisers can provide an objective sounding board.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Yield Curve

    A line that plots the interest rates, at a set point in time, of bonds having equal credit quality, but differing maturity ...
  2. Productivity

    An economic measure of output per unit of input. Inputs include labor and capital, while output is typically measured in ...
  3. Variance

    The spread between numbers in a data set, measuring Variance is calculated by taking the differences between each number ...
  4. Terminal Value - TV

    The value of a bond at maturity, or of an asset at a specified, future valuation date, taking into account factors such as ...
  5. Rule Of 70

    A way to estimate the number of years it takes for a certain variable to double. The rule of 70 states that in order to estimate ...
  6. Risk Premium

    The return in excess of the risk-free rate of return that an investment is expected to yield. An asset's risk premium is ...
Trading Center