Lifestyle Fund

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DEFINITION of 'Lifestyle Fund'

An investment fund featuring an asset mix determined by the level of risk and return that is appropriate for an individual investor. Factors that determine this mix include an investor's age, level of risk aversion, the investment's purpose and the length of time until the principal will be withdrawn.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Lifestyle Fund'

Lifestyle funds can feature conservative, moderate or aggressive growth strategies. Aggressive growth lifestyle funds are targeted to investors in their late 20s, while conservative growth lifestyle funds are targeted to investors in their late 50s.

Lifestyle funds are designed to be the main investment in a person's portfolio. The purpose of a lifestyle fund may be defeated if other funds are chosen at the same time because the asset allocation ratio will become distorted.

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