London International Financial Futures And Options Exchange - LIFFE


DEFINITION of 'London International Financial Futures And Options Exchange - LIFFE'

A futures and options exchange in London, England that was modeled after the Chicago Board of Trade and the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. Similar to its American counterparts, this exchange used to deal with futures, options and commodities contracts. However, in 2002, LIFFE was acquired by Euronext as part of its strategy to increase its presence as a derivatives market. LIFFE has been renamed Euronext.liffe.

BREAKING DOWN 'London International Financial Futures And Options Exchange - LIFFE'

During most of its existence as an independent exchange, LIFFE used the open outcry system to facilitate trades. LIFFE's reluctance to change to an electronic trading system was a cause of its downfall. By the time LIFFE had implemented LIFE CONNECT, a widespread electronic trading platform, fully electronic exchanges had been in operation for almost 10 years and had already snatched up a sizable market share.

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  1. Can mutual funds invest in options and futures?

    Mutual funds invest in not only stocks and fixed-income securities but also options and futures. There exists a separate ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How do futures contracts roll over?

    Traders roll over futures contracts to switch from the front month contract that is close to expiration to another contract ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How does a forward contract differ from a call option?

    Forward contracts and call options are different financial instruments that allow two parties to purchase or sell assets ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Why do companies enter into futures contracts?

    Different types of companies may enter into futures contracts for different purposes. The most common reason is to hedge ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What does a futures contract cost?

    The value of a futures contract is derived from the cash value of the underlying asset. While a futures contract may have ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What are the main risks associated with trading derivatives?

    The primary risks associated with trading derivatives are market, counterparty, liquidity and interconnection risks. Derivatives ... Read Full Answer >>

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