Limited Partner

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DEFINITION of 'Limited Partner'

A partner in a partnership whose liability is limited to the extent of the partner's share of ownership. Limited partners generally do not have any kind of management responsibility in the partnership in which they invest and are not responsible for its debt obligations. For this reason, limited partners are not considered to be material participants.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Limited Partner'

Because they are not material participants, the income that limited partners realize from their partnerships is treated as passive income, and can be offset with passive losses. However, there are a handful of exceptions to this rule. For example, limited partners who participate in a partnership for more than 500 hours in a year may be considered general partners.

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