LindeX

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DEFINITION of 'LindeX'

The online service created and run by Linden Lab that allows users to trade Linden dollars (L$) for United States dollars and vice versa. Users who use LindeX utilize Linden dollars to buy, sell, rent or trade land, or goods and services within the online community Second Life. Residents, who are the users of the game, can create and trade virtual property and/or services with other residents or convert their Linden dollars to USD.

BREAKING DOWN 'LindeX'

The money that is traded on LindeX is constantly monitored and evaluated by Linden Lab to generate economic statistics of the virtual world. LindeX is essentially an exchange where users called residents can trade and exchange Linden dollars with other residents; users do not trade directly with Linden Lab.

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