Lintner's Model

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DEFINITION of 'Lintner's Model'

A model stating that dividend policy has two parameters: (1) the target payout ratio and (2) the speed at which current dividends adjust to the target.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Lintner's Model'

In 1956 John Lintner developed this theory based on two important things that he observed about dividend policy:

1) Companies tend to set long-run target dividends-to-earnings ratios according to the amount of positive net-present-value (NPV) projects they have available.

2) Earnings increases are not always sustainable. As a result, dividend policy is not changed until managers can see that new earnings levels are sustainable.

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