Liquidator

DEFINITION of 'Liquidator'

In the most general sense, a person or entity that liquidates something. More specifically, a liquidator refers to an officer that is specially appointed to wind up the affairs of a company. The liquidator is legally empowered to act on behalf of the company in various capacities.

BREAKING DOWN 'Liquidator'

Liquidators are often used when a company goes bankrupt. One of the chief functions of many liquidators is to bring and defend lawsuits. Other actions include collecting outstanding receivables, paying off debts and finishing other corporate termination procedures.

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