Liquidity Adjustment Facility

DEFINITION of 'Liquidity Adjustment Facility'

A tool used in monetary policy that allows banks to borrow money through repurchase agreements. This arrangement allows banks to respond to liquidity pressures and is used by governments to assure basic stability in the financial markets.

BREAKING DOWN 'Liquidity Adjustment Facility'

Liquidity adjustment facilities are used to aid banks in resolving any short-term cash shortages during periods of economic instability or from any other form of stress caused by forces beyond their control. Various banks will use eligible securities as collateral through a repo agreement and will use the funds to alleviate their short-term requirements, thus remaining stable.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. Under what circumstances would someone enter into a repurchase agreement?

    Learn when investors want to enter into a repurchase agreement, such as to gain quick access to liquidity and enjoy flexibility ... Read Answer >>
  2. What is the difference between a repurchase agreement and reverse repurchase agreement?

    Learn how a repurchase agreement is a form of collateralized lending and a reverse repurchase agreement is a form of collateralized ... Read Answer >>
  3. What risks does the dealer (lender) in a reverse repurchase agreement take on?

    Read about the lender risks of participating in reverse repurchase agreements or for dealers who use the Fed's overnight ... Read Answer >>
  4. What is the primary use of reverse repurchase agreements?

    Discover how the Federal Reserve utilizes reverse purchase agreements for the primary purpose of offsetting temporary shifts ... Read Answer >>
  5. What tax implications are there for parties involved with a reverse repurchase agreement?

    Learn about the tax consequences that the buyer can face as a result of a reverse repurchase agreement ("reverse repo") with ... Read Answer >>
  6. What is each party's role in a reverse repurchase agreement?

    Learn about the role of each party in a reverse repurchase agreement transaction, and find out why it's different if the ... Read Answer >>
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