Liquidity Cushion

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DEFINITION of 'Liquidity Cushion'

A reserve fund for a company or individual made up of highly liquid investments. A liquidity cushion relates to a business or individual holding an ample amount of cash, or other highly liquid assets, in relation to debt, so that a short-term liquidity crunch or other unexpected event will not lead to potentially disastrous consequences.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Liquidity Cushion'

By maintaining cash reserves in money market instruments, unexpected demands on cash don't require the immediate sale of other less liquid securities, which in most cases would not be in the business's or individual's best interest to sell in order to raise cash. For all intents and purposes, liquidity cushion can also be known as a "rainy day fund."

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