What is a 'Listed Property'

A specific class of depreciable property that is subject to a special set of tax rules if it is used for business no more than 50% of the time. Listed property includes such items as vehicles, computer equipment and cell phones. Listed-property rules limit the amount of deductions and depreciation that can be taken if the asset isn't predominantly used in a business or trade.


According to the IRS, listed property includes automobiles weighing less than 6,000 pounds, property used for transportation purposes, properties used for transportation and computers.





BREAKING DOWN 'Listed Property'

If listed property is used primarily for business reasons, then it is subject to the statutory percentage depreciation method. Listed property that is used for business only half the time at most is depreciated under the straight-line method. Cars used solely to carry passengers are also subject to additional limitations on their depreciation.

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