Listed Option


DEFINITION of 'Listed Option'

An option that is sold on a registered exchange, such as the Chicago Board Options Exchange (CBOE) or Euronext. Listed options cover securities such as common stocks, ETFs, market indexes and commodities. All listed options have stated exercise prices and expiration dates.

Also known as "exchange-traded options".

BREAKING DOWN 'Listed Option'

There are many options contracts that are sold OTC in very illiquid market situations, but such trading is usually limited to the buyers and sellers, and the terms tend to be more variable.

There are two types of listed options: American style and European style. The main difference between the two is that American style options can be exercised at any time up to the expiration date, while European style options have a smaller window in which they must be exercised. Most options found on the national exchanges are American style options.

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