Litigation Risk

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DEFINITION of 'Litigation Risk'

The possibility that legal action will be taken because of an individual's or corporation's actions, inactions, products, services or other events. Corporations generally employ some type of litigation risk analysis and management to identify key areas where the litigation risk is high, and thereby take appropriate measures to limit or eliminate those risks.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Litigation Risk'

Litigation risk can be regarded as an individual's or corporation's likelihood of getting taken to court. In a litigious society, all members are at some risk of litigation. Large firms with deep pockets can be especially prone to litigation risk since the rewards for any plaintiffs can be considerable. Corporations typically have measures in place to identify and reduce risks, such as ensuring product safety and following all pertinent laws and regulations.

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