Little Board

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DEFINITION of 'Little Board'

A slang term primarily referring to the American Stock Exchange (AMEX). It can also describe any exchange that is not the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE). Little board was originally used to refer to the New York Consolidated Stock and Petroleum Exchange, which closed its doors in the 1920s.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Little Board'

The nickname is derived from the term "big board", which is used to describe the NYSE. In the early 1900s the consolidated stock exchange was located across the street from the NYSE and picked up the name little board. It was also not so affectionately called "The Morgue". Now "little board" usually refers to the AMEX.

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