Littoral Land

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DEFINITION of 'Littoral Land'

Land that is located next to a pooled body of water. Littoral land includes land that is situated next to a lake, ocean or sea. The term stands in contrast to riparian land, which is land located next to a river or stream.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Littoral Land'

Littoral land is a fancy term for lakefront or oceanfront property. This type of land is usually quite expensive, due primarily to its proximity to the water. This land is often purchased by developers for the purpose of constructing fashionable housing and hotels.

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