Loan Register

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DEFINITION of 'Loan Register'

A journal that chronicles the recording of time loans. The loan register lists when the loans are due, recorded in chronological order, and organizes the list by numbering the loans consecutively. They are used by loan officers to track the maturities of loans so that they can notify their customers that the loans are coming due.

They are also known as "maturity ticklers."

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Loan Register'

Loan registers are important tools for loan officers, who use them to generate follow-up business. Loan officers will generally notify their customers of upcoming maturities either with a personal visit or by mail.

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