London Business School

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DEFINITION

A school of international business in London. The London Business School is also a constituent college of the University of London. The school is consistently ranked as one of the top business schools in the world and offers a very prestigious MBA program.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

London Business School's vision is to have a profound impact on the way the world does business. The School is consistently ranked among the best in the world for its full-time MBA program. In research, the School is ranked top 10 and holds the highest average research score of any U.K. academic institution.
The School's faculty, from over 30 countries, is grouped into seven subject areas: Accounting, Economics, Finance, Management Science and Operations, Marketing, Organizational Behavior, and Strategy and Entrepreneurship. Additionally it has four research centers: Aditya Birla India Center, Center for Corporate Governance, Coller Institute of Private Equity and Deloitte Institute of Innovation and Entrepreneurship.


Studying at the School provides access to an unmatched diversity of thought. With a presence in four international cities - London, New York, Hong Kong and Dubai - the School is well positioned to equip students from more than 100 countries with the capabilities needed to operate in today's business environment. Students further benefit from 33,500 alumni from more than 130 countries, who provide a wealth of knowledge, business experience and worldwide networking opportunities.


The School awards over 1,000 degrees every year, across MBA, Executive MBA, EMBA-Global, Masters in Finance, Masters in Management, Sloan MSc and PhD programs. The Executive Education team offers a portfolio of over 25 open programs as well as custom-designed programs developed to meet the specific needs of individuals and their organizations. Annually, over 7,000 participants attend executive programs that are led by many of the world's leading business thinkers.


For more information visit www.london.edu.




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