Long Tail

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DEFINITION

In business, long tail is a phrase coined by Chris Anderson, in 2004. Anderson argued that products that are in low demand or have low sales volume can collectively make up a market share that rivals or exceeds the relatively few current bestsellers and blockbusters, but only if the store or distribution channel is large enough.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

The tail of a distribution represents a period in time when sales for less common products return a profit due to reduced marketing and distribution costs. Long tail is when sales are made for goods not commonly sold. These goods can return a profit through reduced marketing and distribution costs.


The long tail also serves as a statistical property that states a larger share of population rests within the tail of a probability distribution, especially when it comes to buying patterns.




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