Long Market Value


DEFINITION of 'Long Market Value'

The aggregate worth, in dollars, of a group of securities held in a cash or margin brokerage account, calculated using the prior trading day's closing prices of each security in the account.

BREAKING DOWN 'Long Market Value'

The long market value figure includes most common investment vehicles, but excludes commercial paper, options, annuities and precious metals. Convention dictates that if there is no previous closing price available for a given asset to be included in the calculation, a third party valuation or previous bid price can be used.

  1. Security

    A financial instrument that represents an ownership position ...
  2. Margin

    1. Borrowed money that is used to purchase securities. This practice ...
  3. Option

    A financial derivative that represents a contract sold by one ...
  4. Margin Account

    A brokerage account in which the broker lends the customer cash ...
  5. Broker

    1. An individual or firm that charges a fee or commission for ...
  6. Previous Close

    A security's closing price on the preceding day of trading. Previous ...
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