Long Run Incremental Cost - LRIC

DEFINITION of 'Long Run Incremental Cost - LRIC'

Forward-looking incremental costs that can be accounted for by a company.

BREAKING DOWN 'Long Run Incremental Cost - LRIC'

These are the changing costs that a company can somewhat foresee. For example, oil price increases, rent increases, and expansion and maintenance costs.

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