Long-Term Assets


DEFINITION of 'Long-Term Assets'

1. The value of a company's property, equipment and other capital assets, minus depreciation. This is reported on the balance sheet.

2. A stock, bond or other asset that an investor plans to hold for a long period of time.

BREAKING DOWN 'Long-Term Assets'

Be aware that long-term assets are usually recorded at the price at which they were purchased and do not always reflect the current value of the assets.

  1. Balance Sheet

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  2. Spontaneous Assets

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  3. Capitalize

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  4. Core Holding

    A long-term investment that forms the foundation of an investor's ...
  5. Asset

    1. A resource with economic value that an individual, corporation ...
  6. Long-Term Liabilities

    In accounting, a section of the balance sheet that lists obligations ...
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