Long-Term Assets

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DEFINITION of 'Long-Term Assets'

1. The value of a company's property, equipment and other capital assets, minus depreciation. This is reported on the balance sheet.

2. A stock, bond or other asset that an investor plans to hold for a long period of time.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Long-Term Assets'

Be aware that long-term assets are usually recorded at the price at which they were purchased and do not always reflect the current value of the assets.

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