Long-Term Debt To Capitalization Ratio

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DEFINITION of 'Long-Term Debt To Capitalization Ratio'

A ratio showing the financial leverage of a firm, calculated by dividing long-term debt by the amount of capital available:

Long-Term Debt To Capitalization Ratio

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Long-Term Debt To Capitalization Ratio'

A variation of the traditional debt-to-equity ratio, this value computes the proportion of a company's long-term debt compared to its available capital. By using this ratio, investors can identify the amount of leverage utilized by a specific company and compare it to others to help analyze the company's risk exposure. Generally, companies that finance a greater portion of their capital via debt are considered riskier than those with lower leverage ratios.

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