Long-Term Growth - LTG

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DEFINITION of 'Long-Term Growth - LTG'

An investing strategy or concept where a security will appreciate in value for a relatively long period of time, whether or not the growth is initiated immediately or later on. Long-term growth is a relative term, as the investing horizon differs between investing styles, but the perceived appreciation in the security remains the same.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Long-Term Growth - LTG'

A buy-and-hold investor will define long-term growth as a much longer time period then a trader will. The buy-and-hold strategy looks at a multi-year investing horizon, so short-term price fluctuations are not of major concern as long as the securities fundamentals do not change. On the other hand, a trader is looking more at a weekly, or even a daily time frame, and will be more concerned with the immediate price fluctuations.

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