Long-Term Investments


DEFINITION of 'Long-Term Investments'

An account on the asset side of a company's balance sheet that represents the investments that a company intends to hold for more than a year. They may include stocks, bonds, real estate and cash.

BREAKING DOWN 'Long-Term Investments'

The long-term investments account differs largely from the short-term investments account in that the short-term investments will most likely be sold, whereas the long-term investments may never be sold.

A common form of this type of investing occurs when company A invests largely in company B and gains significant influence over company B without having a majority of the voting shares. In this case, the purchase price would be shown as a long-term investment.

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  4. Does working capital include short-term debt?

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  5. Do dividends affect working capital?

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