Look-Alike Contracts

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Look-Alike Contracts'

A financial product, such as a swap or an option, that is traded over-the-counter and that is cash settled, based on the settlement price of a similar, exchange-traded futures contract, on a specific trading day. Futures look-alike contracts are regulated by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC).

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Look-Alike Contracts'

A NYMEX look-alike, for example, is a look-alike option or look-alike swap, based on a futures contract that is traded on the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX). The contract terms of a look-alike contract, closely correspond with the contract terms of the futures contract. Look-alike contracts are available on a variety of contracts including oil, coal, crude oil, natural gas, Brent (a major classification of crude oil) and WTI (West Texas intermediate, also known as Texas light sweet, a type of crude oil).

RELATED TERMS
  1. Cash Settlement

    A settlement method used in certain future and option contracts ...
  2. Commodity

    1. A basic good used in commerce that is interchangeable with ...
  3. Over-The-Counter - OTC

    A security traded in some context other than on a formal exchange ...
  4. West Texas Intermediate - WTI

    Light, sweet crude oil commonly referred to as "oil" in the Western ...
  5. New York Mercantile Exchange - ...

    The world's largest physical commodity futures exchange. Trading ...
  6. Futures Contract

    A contractual agreement, generally made on the trading floor ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. Who sets the price of commodities?

    Commodities are extremely important as they are essential factors in the production of other goods. A wide of array of commodities ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What are some of the major regulatory agencies responsible for overseeing financial ...

    There are a number of agencies assigned to regulate and oversee financial institutions and financial markets, including the ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What risks should I consider taking a short put position?

    The risks to consider before taking a short put position are the odds of sustained weakness in the asset price and a spike ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What happens if a software glitch fails to execute the strike price I set?

    If you've ever suffered the frustrating experience of having an order not filled or had a strike price fail to execute because ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. In what market situations might a short put be a profitable trade?

    Short puts would be a profitable trade in low-volatility bull markets or range-bound markets. Selling puts is a strategy ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is the relationship between implied volatility and the volatility skew?

    The volatility skew refers to the shape of implied volatilities for options graphed across the range of strike prices for ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Forex Education

    The Pros And Cons Of Trading Forex In An Overseas Account

    The Dodd-Frank Act of 2010 could impact whether overseas accounts benefit FX investors.
  2. Options & Futures

    Fueling Futures In The Energy Market

    The energy market influences every aspect of our lives, and these four options are its driving force.
  3. Options & Futures

    Commodities That Move The Markets

    Find out how the everyday items you use can affect your investments.
  4. Economics

    Overseas Investing No Protection Against Downturn

    The U.S. economy affects many other countries. Find out what this can mean for overseas investments.
  5. Chart Advisor

    3 Ways To Trade The Bounce In Coal

    News from the Supreme Court has caused active traders to turn their attention to the coal markets. We'll take a look at how to trade the bounce.
  6. Investing Basics

    What Does Spot Price Mean?

    Spot price is the current price at which a security may be bought or sold.
  7. Investing Basics

    What is a Greenshoe Option?

    A greenshoe option is a provision in an underwriting agreement that allows the underwriter to buy up to 15% of the shares in an IPO at the offer price.
  8. Investing Basics

    What Does a Clearing House Do?

    A clearing house is a third-party agency or separate entity that acts as a go-between for buyers and sellers in financial markets.
  9. Options & Futures

    How The New NYSE Binary Options Work

    The New York Stock Exchange has launched its own version of binary options called Binary Return Derivatives Options or ByRDs.
  10. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    4 Ways You Can Invest In Gold Without Holding It

    Owning gold can be a store of value and a hedge against unexpected inflation. Holding physical gold, however, can be cumbersome and costly. Fortunately, there are several ways to own gold without ...

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. American Dream

    The belief that anyone, regardless of where they were born or what class they were born into, can attain their own version ...
  2. Multicurrency Note Facility

    A credit facility that finances short- to medium-term Euro notes. Multicurrency note facilities are denominated in many currencies. ...
  3. National Currency

    The currency or legal tender issued by a nation's central bank or monetary authority. The national currency of a nation is ...
  4. Treasury Yield

    The return on investment, expressed as a percentage, on the debt obligations of the U.S. government. Treasuries are considered ...
  5. Bund

    A bond issued by Germany's federal government, or the German word for "bond." Bunds are the German equivalent of U.S. Treasury ...
  6. European Central Bank - ECB

    The central bank responsible for the monetary system of the European Union (EU) and the euro currency. The bank was formed ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!