Loss Ratio

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DEFINITION of 'Loss Ratio '

The difference between the ratios of premiums paid to an insurance company and the claims settled by the company. Loss ratio is the total losses paid by an insurance company in the form of claims. The losses are added to adjustment expenses and then divided by total earned premiums. So if a company pays $80 in claims for every $150 in collected premiums, then the company has a loss ratio of 53%.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Loss Ratio '

Loss ratios vary depending on the type of insurance. For example, for health insurance the loss ratio tends to be higher than for property and casualty such as car insurance. This is an indicator of how well an insurance company is doing. This ratio reflects if companies are collecting premiums higher than the amount paid in claims or if it is not collecting enough premiums to cover claims. Companies that have high loss claims may be experiencing financial trouble.


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