Loss Given Default - LGD

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Loss Given Default - LGD'

The amount of funds that is lost by a bank or other financial institution when a borrower defaults on a loan. Academics suggest that there are several methods for calculating the loss given default, but the most frequently used method compares actual total losses to the total potential exposure at the time of default.

Of course, most banks don't simply calculate the LGD for one loan. Instead, they review their entire portfolio and determine LGD based on cumulative losses and exposure.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Loss Given Default - LGD'

Institutions such as banks will determine their credit losses through an analysis of the actual loan defaults. While quantifying some losses may be simple, in some situations it may be quite difficult and require the analysis of multiple variables. For example, if Bank X loans $1 million to ABC Company and ABC defaults on the note, Bank X's loss isn't necessarily $1 million. This is because Bank X may hold substantial assets as collateral, and/or may use the courts in an effort to be made whole. When all of these variables are factored in, Bank X may have lost substantially less than the original $1 million loan. The process of analyzing all of these variables (as well as all of the other loans in Bank X's portfolio) is paramount to determining the loss given default.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Credit Risk

    The risk of loss of principal or loss of a financial reward stemming ...
  2. Debt

    An amount of money borrowed by one party from another. Many corporations/individuals ...
  3. Default Risk

    The event in which companies or individuals will be unable to ...
  4. Recession

    A significant decline in activity across the economy, lasting ...
  5. Risk

    The chance that an investment's actual return will be different ...
  6. Settlement Risk

    The risk that one party will fail to deliver the terms of a contract ...
Related Articles
  1. A credit rating is a useful tool not only for the investor, but also for the entities looking for investors.
    Investing Basics

    What Is A Corporate Credit Rating?

    Is the bond you're buying investment grade, or just junk? Find out how to check the score.
  2. Credit & Loans

    The Importance Of Your Credit Rating

    A great starting point for learning what a credit score is, how it is calculated and why it is so important.
  3. Retirement

    Risk And Diversification

    Safeguarding your portfolio involves a few simple steps.
  4. Delivery duty paid (DDP) is a shipping term.
    Investing

    What does DDP Mean?

    Delivery duty paid (DDP) is a shipping term specifying that the seller is responsible for all costs associated with delivery of the goods to the buyer. It is usually used when goods are exported ...
  5. Fundamental Analysis

    What is a good interest coverage ratio?

    Learn the importance of the interest coverage ratio, one of the primary debt ratios analysts use to evaluate a company's financial health.
  6. Fundamental Analysis

    What is a bad interest coverage ratio?

    Understand how interest coverage ratio is calculated and what it signifies, and learn what market analysts consider to be an unacceptably low coverage ratio.
  7. Active Trading Fundamentals

    What is liquidity risk?

    Learn how to distinguish between the two broad types of financial liquidity risk: funding liquidity risk and market liquidity risk.
  8. Technical Indicators

    What is a good gearing ratio?

    Understand the meaning of the gearing ratio, how it is calculated, the definition of high and low gearing, and how they reflect relative financial stability.
  9. Investing Basics

    What is considered to be a bad gearing ratio?

    Understand the basics of gearing, including the net gearing ratio, what constitutes a bad gearing ratio and how this figure reflects financial stability.
  10. Active Trading Fundamentals

    What does the gearing ratio say about risk?

    Find out why lenders and investors pay close attention to a firm's gearing ratios, and why both too much and too little borrowing can be risky.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Santa Claus Rally

    A surge in the price of stocks that often occurs in the week between Christmas and New Year's Day. There are numerous explanations ...
  2. Commodity

    1. A basic good used in commerce that is interchangeable with other commodities of the same type. Commodities are most often ...
  3. Deferred Revenue

    Advance payments or unearned revenue, recorded on the recipient's balance sheet as a liability, until the services have been ...
  4. Multinational Corporation - MNC

    A corporation that has its facilities and other assets in at least one country other than its home country. Such companies ...
  5. SWOT Analysis

    A tool that identifies the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of an organization. Specifically, SWOT is a basic, ...
  6. Simple Interest

    A quick method of calculating the interest charge on a loan. Simple interest is determined by multiplying the interest rate ...
Trading Center