Low-Hanging Fruit

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DEFINITION of 'Low-Hanging Fruit'

A commonly used metaphor for doing the simplest or easiest work first. In sales, it means a target that is easy to achieve or a problem that is easy to solve. It refers to the sale of consumer products or services that are easier to sell. A low-hanging fruit presents the most obvious opportunities because they are readily achievable and do not require a lot of effort.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Low-Hanging Fruit'

An example is when sales professionals new to the field tend to seek out the easiest customers to sell to first. These customers are considered "low hanging fruit." A low-hanging fruit is also a strategy a company implements in order to boost sales quickly. However, there are usually only so many low hanging fruits, and once those have been "picked," the company has to put in more effort to achieve results.

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