Loyalty Program

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DEFINITION of 'Loyalty Program'

A rewards program offered by a company to customers who frequently make purchases. A loyalty program may give a customer advanced access to new products, special sales coupons or free merchandise. Customers typically register their personal information with the company and are given a unique identifier, such as a numerical ID or membership card, and use that identifier when making a purchase.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Loyalty Program'

Loyalty programs provide two key functions: they give a customers rewards for brand loyalty and they provide the issuing company with a wealth of consumer information. While companies can evaluate anonymous purchases, the use of a loyalty program gives additional information about the type of products that may be purchased together, and whether certain coupons are more effective than others.

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