Labor-Sponsored Venture Capital Corporations - LSVCC

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DEFINITION of 'Labor-Sponsored Venture Capital Corporations - LSVCC'

A type of Canadian corporation created by a labor union that deals exclusively with providing venture capital. Unlike other venture capital corporations, LSVCCs are subject to tight regulations. The investment funds from LSVCCs are called labor-sponsored investment funds (LSIFs).

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Labor-Sponsored Venture Capital Corporations - LSVCC'

In Canada, LSVCCs, as a group, are the largest providers of venture capital. In fact, about 40% of venture capital is derived from LSVCCs. Canadian investors benefit from participating in LSIFs because not only are LSIFs eligible for RRSPs and other retirement plans, but they also yield both provincial and federal tax credits.

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