Luxury Automobile Limitations

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DEFINITION of 'Luxury Automobile Limitations'

An annual limit on the amount of depreciation that can be taken on a luxury car used for business purposes. This amount is indexed each year for inflation. The purpose of luxury automobile limitations is to control the type and amount of money spent on luxury automobiles by businesses for tax purposes.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Luxury Automobile Limitations'

The limitations apply to any four-wheeled vehicle used primarily on public streets. The economic stimulus package of 2008 temporarily raised the luxury automobile limitations to $10,960 for cars and $11,060 for trucks and vans. There are several different categories of luxury cars, and each has a different depreciation schedule.

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