Macro Accounting

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DEFINITION of 'Macro Accounting'

Accounting for the total or aggregate economic activities of a nation. Macro accounting forms the basis for the official statistics that summarize a nation's economic development and performance, and looks at the whole economic picture rather than focusing on individuals or single companies.

Also known as "national accounting.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Macro Accounting'

Macro accounting deals with national statistics and economic indicators such as a nation's gross domestic product, external debt and so on. These figures are released on a periodic basis, usually monthly or quarterly by government bodies. They are closely watched by financial market participants to assess a nation's economic performance.

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