Macro Manager

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DEFINITION of 'Macro Manager'

A boss or supervisor who lets employees do their jobs with minimal supervision. Macro managers are thought of by some employees as superiors who do not give them enough support or feedback to do their jobs effectively, while others may be glad to be trusted and left alone. A macro manager is the opposite of a micro manager, a supervisor who constantly looks over employees' shoulders and is often perceived as controlling and overly critical.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Macro Manager'

The term "macro manager" can also describe someone who runs a global macro hedge fund. Global macro managers need to have a broad knowledge base to understand big-picture influences on investment performance in the global marketplace. Such influences include political events, government policies and the way different countries' central banks function. George Soros, Julian Robertson and Michael Steinhardt are well-known global macro managers.

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