Macroeconomic Factor

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DEFINITION of 'Macroeconomic Factor'

A factor that is pertinent to a broad economy at the regional or national level and affects a large population rather than a few select individuals. Macroeconomic factors such as economic output, unemployment, inflation, savings and investment are key indicators of economic performance and are closely monitored by governments, businesses and consumers.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Macroeconomic Factor'

The interplay or relationship between various macroeconomic factors is the subject of a great deal of study in the field of macroeconomics. While macroeconomics deals with the economy as a whole, microeconomics is concerned with the study of individual agents such as consumers and businesses and their economic decision-making.

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