Macroeconomic Swap

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Macroeconomic Swap'

A type of derivative designed to help companies whose revenues are closely correlated with business cycles to reduce their business-cycle risk. In a macroeconomic swap, also called a macro swap, a variable stream of payments based on a macroeconomic indicator is exchanged for a fixed stream of payments. The exchange occurs between an end user and a macro swap dealer.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Macroeconomic Swap'

Macroeconomic swaps were introduced to the market in the early 1990s. Types of indicators that may be used include, but are not limited to, the Consumer Confidence Index, the Wholesale Price Index, inflation rates, unemployment rates, gross national product and gross domestic product. In most types of swaps, the underlying asset can be traded, but this is not true for macroeconomic swaps.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Reverse Swap

    An exchange of cash flow streams that undoes the effects of an ...
  2. Debt For Bond Swap

    A debt swap involving the exchange of a new bond issue for similar ...
  3. Interest Rate Swap

    An agreement between two parties (known as counterparties) where ...
  4. Forward Swap

    A swap agreement created through the synthesis of two swaps differing ...
  5. Credit Default Swap - CDS

    A swap designed to transfer the credit exposure of fixed income ...
  6. Currency Swap

    A swap that involves the exchange of principal and interest in ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the difference between term structure and a yield curve?

    There is no difference between term structure and a yield curve; the yield curve is simply another name to describe the term ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the opposite of a "dove"?

    A dove is an economic policy adviser who favors maintaining low interest rates in hopes of stimulating the economy, while ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How do you calculate GDP with the expenditures approach?

    To calculate gross domestic product, or GDP, with the expenditures approach, add up the sums of all consumer spending, government ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How will a value added tax impact the government budget?

    In 1992, the Congressional Budget Office conducted an economic study on value-added tax, or VAT. At the time, the CBO concluded ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the correlation between money supply and GDP?

    It is difficult to measure the money supply, but most economists use the Federal Reserve's aggregates known as M1 and M2. ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. In what manner will a recession likely affect the marginal-propensity-to-save rate ...

    The marginal propensity to save, or MPS, rises in most, though not all, recessions. This makes perfect sense on an individual ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    Economic Indicators That Do-It-Yourself Investors Should Know

    Understanding these investing tools will put the market in your hands.
  2. Options & Futures

    Are Derivatives Safe For Retail Investors?

    These vehicles have gotten a bad rap in the press. Find out whether they deserve it.
  3. Options & Futures

    An Introduction To Swaps

    Learn how these derivatives work and how companies can benefit from them.
  4. Options & Futures

    Explaining The World Through Macroeconomic Analysis

    From unemployment and inflation to government policy, learn what macroeconomics measures and how it affects everyone.
  5. Active Trading

    How Companies Use Derivatives To Hedge Risk

    Derivatives can reduce the risks associated with changes in foreign exchange rates, interest rates and commodity prices.
  6. Economics

    Cashing In On Macroeconomic Trends

    Learn to identify the things that may impact your investments down the road.
  7. Economics

    What is a Resident Alien?

    A resident alien is a foreigner who is a permanent resident of the country in which he or she resides but does not have citizenship.
  8. Economics

    Explaining Protectionism

    Protectionism is government measures that limit imports into a country to protect commerce within that country against foreign competition.
  9. Economics

    What is Neoliberalism?

    Neoliberalism is a little-used term to describe an economy where the government has few, if any, controls on economic factors.
  10. Economics

    Understanding Natural Unemployment

    Natural unemployment is often defined as the lowest rate of unemployment an economy will reach.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Radner Equilibrium

    A theory suggesting that if economic decision makers have unlimited computational capacity for choice among strategies, then ...
  2. Inbound Cash Flow

    Any currency that a company or individual receives through conducting a transaction with another party. Inbound cash flow ...
  3. Social Security

    A United States federal program of social insurance and benefits developed in 1935. The Social Security program's benefits ...
  4. American Dream

    The belief that anyone, regardless of where they were born or what class they were born into, can attain their own version ...
  5. Multicurrency Note Facility

    A credit facility that finances short- to medium-term Euro notes. Multicurrency note facilities are denominated in many currencies. ...
  6. National Currency

    The currency or legal tender issued by a nation's central bank or monetary authority. The national currency of a nation is ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!