Macromarketing

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DEFINITION of 'Macromarketing'

The effect that marketing policies and strategies have on the economy and society as a whole. Specifically, macromarketing refers to how product, price, place and promotion strategies - the four P's of marketing - create demand for goods and services, and thus influence what is produced and sold in an economy.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Macromarketing'

Over the centuries, businesses have become more adept at reaching potential consumers through an expanding set of mediums. Marketing, therefore, has become a part of the daily life of a consumer, since consumers are exposed to advertisements for products and services wherever they turn. Because marketing affects what consumers do, it in turn affects how individuals and businesses interact with the environment as a whole.

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