Maintenance Bond

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DEFINITION of 'Maintenance Bond'

A type of surety bond purchased by a contractor that protects the owner of a completed construction project for a specified time period against defects and faults in materials, workmanship and design that could arise later if the project was done incorrectly. A maintenance bond is not technically insurance, but basically functions as an insurance policy on a construction project to make sure a contractor will either correct any defects that arise or that the owner is compensated for those defects. Pricing a maintenance bond is very different from pricing regular coupon paying bonds.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Maintenance Bond'

A surety bond is a three-way contract where a third party called the surety guarantees the contractual obligations of one party (the principal) to another party (the obligee) by agreeing to pay a sum to the obligee as compensation if the principal does not fulfill its obligations. The surety assures the obligee that the principal will perform the required tasks. A maintenance bond is structured in such a way.

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