Make-Or-Buy Decision


DEFINITION of 'Make-Or-Buy Decision'

The act of choosing between manufacturing a product in-house or purchasing it from an external supplier. In a make-or-buy decision, the two most important factors to consider are cost and availability of production capacity.

An enterprise may decide to purchase the product rather than producing it, if is cheaper to buy than make or if it does not have sufficient production capacity to produce it in-house. With the phenomenal surge in global outsourcing over the past decades, the make-or-buy decision is one that managers have to grapple with very frequently.


Loading the player...

BREAKING DOWN 'Make-Or-Buy Decision'

Factors that may influence a firm's decision to buy a part rather than produce it internally include lack of in-house expertise, small volume requirements, desire for multiple sourcing, and the fact that the item may not be critical to its strategy. Similarly, factors that may tilt a firm towards making an item in-house include existing idle production capacity, better quality control or proprietary technology that needs to be protected.

  1. Economies Of Scale

    Economies of scale is the cost advantage that arises with increased ...
  2. Insourcing

    Assigning a project to a person or department within the company ...
  3. Minimum Efficient Scale

    The smallest amount of production a company can achieve while ...
  4. Outsourcing

    A practice used by different companies to reduce costs by transferring ...
  5. Production Efficiency

    1. An economic level at which the economy can no longer produce ...
  6. Internal Rate Of Return - IRR

    A metric used in capital budgeting measuring the profitability ...
Related Articles
  1. Economics

    What Happens in a Make-or-Buy Decision?

    A make-or-buy decision happens when a company must choose to either manufacture an item itself, or buy it premade from a supplier.
  2. Economics

    Globalization: Progress Or Profiteering?

    Proponents of globalization argue that it helps the economies of developing nations and makes goods cheaper, while critics say that globalization reduces domestic jobs and exploits foreign workers. ...
  3. Markets

    Company Clone Cost Reveals True Value

    Find out how calculating a reproduction cost for a company can beat out the dividend discount model.
  4. Fundamental Analysis

    Vital Link: Manufacturing And Economic Recovery

    Manufacturing output is one of the clearest signs that an economy is recovering from a recession.
  5. Economics

    Long-Term Investing Impact of the Paris Attacks

    We share some insights on how the recent terrorist attacks in Paris could impact the economy and markets going forward.
  6. Economics

    5 States with the Highest GDP Per Capita

    Learn about the top five states ranked by their real gross domestic product (GDP) per capita as of 2014: Alaska, North Dakota, New York, Connecticut and Wyoming.
  7. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    The Next Big ETFs Might Be From Latin America

    These ETFs are an excellent place to start for any investor interested in betting on Latin America.
  8. Investing Basics

    Should You Get A Six Sigma Black Belt? Average Salary: 98K

    Interested in the Six Sigma Black Belt but unsure whether you need one? Here's a guide to it and how it differs from other belts.
  9. Active Trading Fundamentals

    Learn To Use This Leading Indicator of Home Sales

    By following the trend shown in the MBA Purchase Index, investors can identify investment opportunities in businesses that are poised to benefit, and find cautionary signals around industries ...
  10. Investing

    Is US Inflation Too Low?

    One reason the Fed has delayed its first rate hike: U.S. inflation has been persistently running below the stated 2 % level the central bank seeks to target.
  1. Is Israel a developed country?

    Israel is considered a developed country, although it has substantial poverty and large income gaps. The International Monetary ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Do you discount working capital in net present value (NPV)?

    Net present value (NPV) calculations should include the discounted value of changes in working capital. This treatment of ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How is working capital different from fixed capital?

    There are several key differences between working capital and fixed capital. Most importantly, these two forms of capital ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How much working capital does a small business need?

    The amount of working capital a small business needs to run smoothly depends largely on the type of business, its operating ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What does high working capital say about a company's financial prospects?

    If a company has high working capital, it has more than enough liquid funds to meet its short-term obligations. Working capital, ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What can working capital be used for?

    Working capital is used to cover all of a company's short-term expenses, including inventory, payments on short-term debt ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Turkey

    Slang for an investment that yields disappointing results or turns out worse than expected. Failed business deals, securities ...
  2. Barefoot Pilgrim

    A slang term for an unsophisticated investor who loses all of his or her wealth by trading equities in the stock market. ...
  3. Quick Ratio

    The quick ratio is an indicator of a company’s short-term liquidity. The quick ratio measures a company’s ability to meet ...
  4. Black Tuesday

    October 29, 1929, when the DJIA fell 12% - one of the largest one-day drops in stock market history. More than 16 million ...
  5. Black Monday

    October 19, 1987, when the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) lost almost 22% in a single day. That event marked the beginning ...
  6. Monetary Policy

    Monetary policy is the actions of a central bank, currency board or other regulatory committee that determine the size and ...
Trading Center