Management Audit

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Management Audit'

Analysis and assessment of competencies and capabilities of a company's management in order to evaluate their effectiveness, especially with regard to the strategic objectives and policies of the business. The objective of a management audit is not to appraise individual executive performance, but to evaluate the management team in relation to their competition.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Management Audit'

Management audits are often necessitated by major changes in a business. Some of the events that call for a management audit are top management changes, mergers and acquisitions, and succession planning.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Management By Objectives - MBO

    A management model that aims to improve performance of an organization ...
  2. Chairman

    An executive elected by a company's board of directors that is ...
  3. Auditor

    An official whose job it is to carefully check the accuracy of ...
  4. Shakeup

    A series of events and processes that a company's management ...
  5. Audit

    1. An unbiased examination and evaluation of the financial statements ...
  6. Value Of Risk (VOR)

    The financial benefit that a risk-taking activity will bring ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. How are contingent liabilities reflected on a balance sheet

    Contingent liabilities need to pass two thresholds before they can be reported in the financial statements. First, it must ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How do businesses determine if an asset may be impaired?

    In the United States, assets are considered impaired when net carrying value (book value) exceeds expected future cash flows. ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How can I set up an accrual accounting system for a small business?

    First, determine whether accrual accounting makes the most sense practically and financially. If the small business is also ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Why is work in progress (WIP) considered a current asset in accounting?

    Accountants consider work in progress (WIP) to be a current asset because it is a type of inventory asset. Accountants consider ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What exactly does EBITDA margin tell investors about a company?

    EBITDA stands for earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization. EBITDA margins provide investors a snapshot ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How can you use a cash flow statement to make a budget?

    To use the cash flow statement to make a budget, a company needs to combine the operating cash flow portion of its cash flow ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Active Trading Fundamentals

    Evaluating A Company's Management

    Financial statements don't tell you everything about a company's health. Investigate the management behind the numbers!
  2. Markets

    Get Tough On Management Puff

    Company managers are often skilled at fooling investors. Be critical and don't believe the hype.
  3. Options & Futures

    When Insiders Buy, Should Investors Join Them?

    Insider tracking can inform your investment strategy, but it requires research and a level head. Find out what to look for.
  4. Options & Futures

    Governance Pays

    Learn about how the way a company keeps its management in check can affect the bottom line.
  5. Options & Futures

    Putting Management Under The Microscope

    We tell you where to find the telltale signs of corporate misdeeds.
  6. Fundamental Analysis

    What is Quantitative Analysis?

    Quantitative analysis refers to the use of mathematical computations to analyze markets and investments.
  7. Economics

    Explaining Residual Value

    Residual value is a measurement of how much a fixed asset is worth at the end of its lease, or at the end of its useful life.
  8. Fundamental Analysis

    Why Last In First Out Is Banned Under IFRS

    We explain why Last-In-First-Out is banned under IFRS
  9. Economics

    Understanding Carrying Value

    Carrying value is the value of an asset as listed on a company’s balance sheet. Carrying value is the same as book value.
  10. Economics

    International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS)

    International Financial Reporting Standards are accounting rules and guidelines governing the reporting of different types of accounting transactions.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Fiduciary

    1. A person legally appointed and authorized to hold assets in trust for another person. The fiduciary manages the assets ...
  2. Expected Return

    The amount one would anticipate receiving on an investment that has various known or expected rates of return. For example, ...
  3. Carrying Value

    An accounting measure of value, where the value of an asset or a company is based on the figures in the company's balance ...
  4. Capital Account

    A national account that shows the net change in asset ownership for a nation. The capital account is the net result of public ...
  5. Brand Equity

    The value premium that a company realizes from a product with a recognizable name as compared to its generic equivalent. ...
Trading Center