Management Fee

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DEFINITION of 'Management Fee'

A charge levied by an investment manager for managing an investment fund. The management fee is intended to compensate the managers for their time and expertise. It can also include other items such as investor relations expenses and the administration costs of the fund.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Management Fee'

The management fee is the cost of having your assets professionally managed. The fee pays other people to select which securities your money (along with that of the other investors in the fund) is invested into, to do all the paperwork needed and to provide information about the fund's holdings and performance.

Management fee structures vary from fund to fund, but they are typically based on a percentage of assets under management. For example, a mutual fund's management fee could be stated as 0.5% of assets under management.

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