Manual Execution

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DEFINITION

A method of trading with the help of a dealer or broker, versus trading automatically. Manual executions tend to be slower than automatic ones, in which trades are inputted quickly and often in real time, thus giving investors a time advantage. Different fees are charged by exchanges for manual executions versus automatic executions.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

Securities traded manually require several extra steps to process the trade and can take several minutes to actually be executed. Since stock and forex markets are so fast paced where millions of transactions are done in minutes and the price of a stock or currency can rise or fall almost instantly, a manual execution could place investors at a disadvantage.


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