Manufacturing Resource Planning - MRP II

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DEFINITION

An integrated information system used by businesses. Manufacturing Resource Planning (MRP II) evolved from early Materials Requirement Planning (MRP) systems by including the integration of additional data, such as employee and financial needs. The system is designed to centralize, integrate and process information for effective decision making in scheduling, design engineering, inventory management and cost control in manufacturing.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

MRP II is a computer-based system that can create detail production schedules using realtime data to coordinate the arrival of component materials with machine and labor availability. MRP II is used widely by itself, but also as a module of more extensive enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems.


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