Maple Bond

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DEFINITION of 'Maple Bond'

A bond denominated in Canadian dollars that is sold in Canada by foreign financial institutions and companies. Similar to other foreign bonds, such as the bulldog bond, samurai bond and matilda bond, the maple bond gives domestic investors (in this case, Canadian investors) the opportunity to invest in foreign companies without worrying about the effects of currency exchange fluctuations.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Maple Bond'

Foreign companies can use maple bond issues to raise Canadian dollars for setting up operations in Canada.

When foreign content restrictions on registered investments were removed in Canada in 2005, maple bonds quickly gained in popularity. According to Statistics Canada, nearly $27 billion worth of maple bonds were invested in 2006. However, their popularity plunged as a result of the credit crisis in 2008, as Canadian investors shied away from debt sold by foreign companies.

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