Margin Account

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DEFINITION of 'Margin Account'

A brokerage account in which the broker lends the customer cash to purchase securities. The loan in the account is collateralized by the securities and cash. If the value of the stock drops sufficiently, the account holder will be required to deposit more cash or sell a portion of the stock.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Margin Account'

In a margin account, you are investing with your broker's money. By using leverage in such a way, you magnify both gains and losses.

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    The strike price of a bought or sold option cannot be changed once that option is traded. Rather, the strike price of the ... Read Full Answer >>
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  5. How is it possible to trade on a stock you don't own, as is done in short selling?

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  6. When short selling, how long should you hold on to a short?

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  7. How does margin trading in the forex market work?

    When an investor uses a margin account, he or she is essentially borrowing to increase the possible return on investment. ... Read Full Answer >>
  8. What does it mean when the shares in my account have been liquidated?

    An account liquidation occurs when the holdings of an account are sold off by the firm in which the account was created. ... Read Full Answer >>
  9. When short selling a stock, how long does a short seller have before covering?

    There are no general rules regarding how long a short sale can last before being closed out. A short sale is a transaction ... Read Full Answer >>
  10. Why do you need a margin account to short sell stocks?

    The reason that margin accounts and only margin accounts can be used to short sell stocks has to do with Regulation T, a ... Read Full Answer >>
  11. What is a margin account?

    A margin account is an account offered by brokerages that allows investors to borrow money to buy securities. An investor ... Read Full Answer >>
  12. What are the minimum margin requirements for a short sale account?

    In a short sale transaction, the investor borrows shares and sells them on the market in the hope that the share price will ... Read Full Answer >>
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