Marginal Land

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DEFINITION of 'Marginal Land'

Arid and generally unhospitable land. Marginal land usually has little or no potential for profit, and often has poor soil or other undesirable characteristics. This land is often located at the edge of deserts or other desolate areas.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Marginal Land'

Marginal land is usually fairly low in value. It is marked by its inability to produce crops of any kind or otherwise yield a profit. In the U.S. much of it can be found in the southwest, in such states as Nevada.

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