Marital Deduction

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DEFINITION of 'Marital Deduction'

A tax deduction that allows an individual to transfer some assets to his or her spouse tax free, creating a reduction in taxable income. A marital deduction is mainly used for the purposes of estates and gifts.

BREAKING DOWN 'Marital Deduction'

The Internal Revenue Service has strict guidelines for allowable deductions, so it is important to make sure that you or your accountant adheres to them when making deductions.

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