Market Capitalization Rule

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DEFINITION of 'Market Capitalization Rule'

A rule set by the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) to determine a minimum market value to be listed continuously. The Market Capitalization Rule states that companies must maintain a minimum value of $25 million over 30 consecutive days to remain listed. This standard value was set in 2004.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Market Capitalization Rule'

Due to the downturn of the global economy in 2008-2009, the NYSE temporarily amended the market capitalization rule in January of 2009. The minimum value was reduced so that companies who are able to maintain a market value of over $15 million for 30 trading days in a row would remain listed until April 22, 2009.

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