Market Neutral Fund

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DEFINITION of 'Market Neutral Fund'

An aggressive type of mutual fund that aims to deliver superior returns by balancing bullish stock picks with bearish ones. They can also generate income from the interest proceeds of the sales of short securities. The objective of these funds is to generate consistent returns that are at least three to six percent above the T-bill rate. These funds can also offer returns similar to leveraged ETFs which aim to deliver 200-300% returns on any given investment.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Market Neutral Fund'

Market neutral funds are fairly complex products. They are also probably not appropriate for novice or conservative investors. These funds endeavor to offer a type of investing strategy that has been found chiefly in hedge funds and separately managed accounts. Market neutral funds tend to have fairly high fees as well as turnover, and investors should consider both these issues before investing.

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